Textured Feature Walls

One of the most common questions I get asked in the Interior Design world is this. “I have a big fat blank wall and I don’t know what to do with it. Please help me?” Perhaps that exact question is the reason you are here. Well never fear, my friends, I aim to please!

For most people, the simple answer is to paint it. For others, wallpaper will suffice. Don’t get me wrong, I love a bold colour and a good wallpaper as much as the next person, but a lot of the time these solutions just don’t cut it in my books.

A feature wall should be a statement piece. A talking point. A mood setter.

To help you in your quest for the perfect wall, I have curated a collection of my favourite yet on trend textural feature walls. From traditional VJ panels to concrete slabs, there’s something here for everyone.

Modern Moulding

This is a super fun one, and can be done DIY if you’re that way inclined. Created using moulding or beading in a size of your choosing, a pattern is created on an exisiting wall, nailed or screwed on, and painted out in your favourite colour. I must say, this super modern look is one that gives me all the heart eyes, particularly when painted in a sexy charcoal.

Timber Shingles

A trend used mostly in commercial spaces such as offices and restaurants, timber shingle walls are a textural feast for the eyes. With a multitude of shapes on the market, and all those beautiful natural tones, this idea could be something worth exploring. Designer tip: don’t bother with small spaces such as bedrooms, save this one for a long entry wall or double height void where a show stopper is required.

Image credit: CR Decoration

Image credit: CR Decoration

Image credit: Yellowtrace

Image credit: Yellowtrace

Image credit: Tarruella Trenchs Studio

Image credit: Tarruella Trenchs Studio

VJ Panels

Once a signature of traditional Queenslander’s, VJ panels have weaselled their way into the modern home in the form of feature walls. There is no doubt that this tongue and groove cladding oozes rustic charm, but vertical lines also help to create the illusion of a higher ceiling. Win, win!

Colour is everything with VJ panels, with whites and greys throwing a coastal chic vibe, and deep blues and charcoals will create a sense of modern luxe. Designer tip: All in all it’s hard to get this look wrong, but unless you’re restoring a genuine Queenslander, try to use VJ Panels on only one wall in any given room.

Concrete Panels

If you’re anything like me, you’ll appreciate a thing called ‘brutalism’. Look it up, it’s not as scary as it sounds, I promise! However it does take an undying love of all things industrial and modern to go forth with this trend. Now some people are more hardcore than others and will literally build their homes from giant slabs of concrete, but I’m a big believer of moderation, and a feature wall is certainly easier to digest!

This is where Cemintel comes in, a fibre cement product that will give you all the raw, industrial feels. Shown below is Territory Quarry Urban Grey, my personal favourite and go-to product.

Image credit: Big House Little House

Image credit: Big House Little House

Image credit: contemporist.com

Image credit: contemporist.com

Exposed Brick

Once an unsightly building material, in the past bricks were covered up in any way possible. These days we love to embrace them, bringing a raw, textural element to any space. Not a new trend by any stretch, exposed brick has been around the block, but let’s just say it’s decided to move in permanently. Ideally you would have a pre-exisiting brick wall to work with to bring in that authentic feel, but there is no shame in creating a new one from scratch.

For new builds, I recommend getting one included on your plans / specs so it is still a built-in brick wall. There are some amazing bricks and colour-ways out there, from traditional to super modern. For a renovation, painting internal bricks is one of the best ways to have a clean textural look, or for a rustic look, you could consider a brick-look tile. Trust me when I say there is a huge range out there but this bad boy is still my favourite.

Image credit: architectureau.com

Image credit: architectureau.com

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What’s your favourite textural feature wall? For more ideas or any questions, leave a comment!